Open source requires a senatorial style of leadership to move big projects forward since there isn't necessarily a single key decision maker.

Joe McGill

Are you a software developer?

Do you run macOS?

Do you frequently checkout files from third party code repositories?

Do you use an IDE like PHPStorm, Xcode, Atom, Netbeans, or something else?

Do you frequently run commands like npm install that reach out to the web and pull down a bajillion files you will literally never-ever open even if your life depended on it?

I do… and that’s why I block macOS Spotlight from indexing the parent directory to all of those files. It’s a dead simple and obvious thing to do once you think of it.

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WordPress, to me, is an independent publishing platform. It grants me the right to complete & total autonomy when it’s desireable, but also allows me to group up with others when that makes sense too.

An article from The New York Times puts into a nice perspective why I think WordPress is really important to the future of the web.

Every pirated music video or song posted on YouTube or Facebook robs the creators of income, and YouTube in particular is dominated by unlicensed content. Google’s YouTube has an over 55 percent market share in the streaming audio business and yet provides less than 11 percent of the streaming audio revenues to the content owners and creators. But Facebook, which refuses to enter into any licensing agreement on music or video, is challenging YouTube in the free online video and music world.

And this…

“They are taking all the money,” he noted. “They have algorithms we don’t understand, which are a filter between what we do and how people receive it.”

I don’t think this is anything new – tides will shift, and new technologies will emerge to try and help with distribution of content – but it’s scary to me now that so much of what’s being published funnels out into our enormous world through only a few hoses.

There’s more money in the world changing hands than every in recorded history, and I suppose it’s always been this way – content creators are starving artists and content distributors are benefactors – but the trickle-down distribution of wealth continues to run perpetually dryer vs. wetter.

I think in the WordPress space, companies like Envato are undervalued. Their operating costs are surely not as low as one may think, yet they continue to pay out millions of dollars to digital artists & creators. I think there may be room for more Envato’s to carve out their own niches, and WordPress plugins like Easy Digital Downloads and WooCommerce are the long-term solutions for people hoping to have a sustainable independent lifestyle.

On Facebook, my old pal Josh mentioned how terrible Siri is, and it reminded me of a comparison I frequently make to my tech-informed friends:

Akismet is actually my benchmark for services like this – the promise of “getting better with age” isn’t one you can just make & walk away from, and Akismet had constant non-stop tuning done to it for several years in a row to make it as good as it is now. Siri hasn’t improved, and the snarky responses when she doesn’t understand have only gotten more irritating.

Imagine if Akismet replied with “I’m sorry; I can’t tell if this is spam or delicious commentary.” every-time it wasn’t confident.

Akismet is so good, nothing in the space really comes close yet. I think that means it’s also ripe for competition, and newer insights into machine learning & big-data help make that more possible, but Akismet has such a huge head start it would be hard to play catch-up.

In my job, I work with a lot of meta-data. (If you’re not sure what meta-data is, go search the web & come back; I’ll wait here…)

I’m frequently annoyed at a lack of an icon for it. Unlike technologies like RSS, HTML5, and so on, meta-data is harder to visualize and define because it means many different things in many different applications.

In WordPress, meta-data traditionally refers to our arbitrary key-value storage system for primary objects like posts, comments, users, taxonomy terms, and so on. It also refers to the team of mostly-volunteer staff that help build & maintain wordpress.org and the surrounding galaxy of sites connected to it.

Right now, WordPress’s Meta team uses the networking icon as it’s mark, which isn’t bad, but I don’ really think it’s right. It looks like this:

Screen Shot 2016-09-04 at 12.20.48.png

I was also working on a WordPress plugin for multisite blog-meta, and couldn’t find a suitable icon, so I decided to take a stab at one myself.

Of course, it’s likely a similar design exists somewhere for something else (and any similarities are accidental & coincidental) and I have a bad habit of thinking I’ve invented something only to learn someone on the web beat me to it.

I figure, it’s better to put something out into the world for scrutiny sooner, so here’s what I came up with in a pinch, and you can see it in action here:

 

Dark

Light

All of the assets are up on Github, pull-requests encouraged. ❤️

P.S. Please don’t sue me if this icon is already a thing. I promise, I had no idea, and Google’s reverse image search came up empty, so maybe you should look into that instead of bothering lil’ol me.